Too Fat to Fly? Then Lose The Fat And You’ll Soar.

I LOVE to eat as much as the next guy. I am always munching on something. I am a huge fan of tofu and because it’s such a versatile substance–I love eating it in various ways: Mapo style, fried, soup. I also enjoy my steak medium rare. Meat. I LOVE meat. Don’t get me started on Korean BBQ. And dessert? There’s an extra “s” in the word for a reason–dessert is extra scrumptious! But at some point, I have to wonder: am I eating to live or am I living to eat? I’m very fortunate–it’s not like I’m living in parts of Africa where McDonald’s is seen as a luxury. I have choices–I just don’t always make the right ones.

Don’t let the Winter Olympics and the image of healthy American athletes fool you America–you are getting  FAT!  Or maybe I need to be politically correct and more sensitive–you are getting obese–morbidly obese. According to the American Medical Association (AMA):

The researchers found that in 2007-2008, the prevalence of obesity was 33.8 percent overall. Among men, prevalence was 32.2 percent overall and within racial and ethnic groups ranged from 31.9 percent among non-Hispanic white men to 37.3 percent among non-Hispanic black men. For women, the prevalence was 35.5 percent overall, and ranged from 33.0 percent among non-Hispanic white women to 49.6 percent among non-Hispanic black women. The prevalence of overweight and obesity combined was 68.0 percent overall, 72.3 percent among men, and 64.1 percent among women.

Wake up and smell the Starbucks coffee. Okay, don’t because even too much of that can be bad for you. But you really need to get out of your seats and do something active. Currently, obesity is in the media once again as a result of “Clerks” and “Jay and Silent Bob” director Kevin Smith. He was kicked off a Southwest airplane for pretty much being fat. Now, as much as I don’t agree with how Southwest treated Smith, I do hope it’s a wake up call for Smith.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not hating on fat people. I think I’m fat myself. I’m fighting my own weight-loss battles, and so far I’m winning slowly. Very slowly. But I’m on the way if I can keep up all this activity I do. I just hate it when we fat people make excuses. We are the first to blame genetics–you know, the classic case in Psychology: nature versus nurture. It’s in my nature to be fat. After all, we can’t all have Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt as our mom and dad. And children who have obese parents are more likely to be obese themselves because it’s in their genetic make-up. But we can’t just excuse ourselves because of genetics. There’s also your environment. Your lifestyle choices also play a role. Whether you choose to head to the gym and undergo intense workouts or to pick up that red velvet vanilla frosted cupcake or to go out running a mile or two or to stay at home at watch 6 hours of TV–those choices are yours and yours alone. Unless you have some major health problem that doesn’t allow you mobility, you have no one to blame but yourself–the choices you made.

Writer William Saletan in his 2008 article, “Fat Chance:Obesity, genetics, and responsibility.” :

How do we know the modern environment is a factor? Because the obesity rate has soared in less than a generation. As the authors point out, “The dramatic rise in childhood obesity in the past 15 years is clearly due to changes in the environment, because genes have not altered.” But this implies a paradox: “Obesity is both predominantly environmental … and predominantly genetic.”

How can this be? Because genetic and environmental influences are measured differently. What’s genetic is the weight variation within a population, such as the kids in your neighborhood. What’s environmental is the weight variation between populations: kids in your neighborhood today, compared with kids in your neighborhood 15 years ago.

So that’s it then. My fatness is partly due to my genetics, but it’s mainly on me. If I want ripped abs like Taylor Lautner or a mighty chest like Gerard Butler (who reportedly gained a few pounds last year, but is back in shape in recent photos). I can’t just wish it into existence. I have to act on it. It starts with me and the choices I make. The English poet, William Ernest Henley said it best: “I am the master of my fate: I am the captain of my soul.” And so goes my obese identity revealed–I need to drop that donut and go on that mile run now. Oooh…donut. No…bad donut. Run fool, run.

And while I run, I’m going to be thinking a lot about this fat war:

1. Regarding airplane seating: should obese people pay extra if they take up an extra seat or is that discrimination?

2. Why aren’t we making good choices in our eating habits? Is it because healthy food just isn’t affordable?

3. Do we make up lots of excuses so we can stay comfortable being fat?

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